Month: June 2021

Tui targets big month ahead for Chiefs

first_imgIndeed, the Chiefs showed last time out that they are happy to perform for the entire game. In their ten-try show against visiting Prato, three of their scores came in the final five minutes. Whilst in Perpignan the week previous, the Chiefs were always in contention in what was a full-on battle against their French hosts.Tui added: “When we went away to Perpignan we did a lot of good things, but we also did a few things that we’ve since been able to work on these past two weeks. Last week against Prato the boys put the things we had worked on into action and we ended up scoring 10 quality tries. It seemed everything we trained on during the week came to plan.”With little footage of Prato to focus on ahead of kick-off, the Chiefs used much of their pre-game planning to focus their thoughts on themselves rather than the opposition. It was – according to Tui – a refreshing change to the norm. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS EXETER, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 12: Hoani Tui of Exeter Chiefs looks on during the Aviva Premiership match between Exeter Chiefs and Harlequins at Sandy Park Stadium on February 12, 2011 in Exeter, England. (Photo by Tom Dulat/Getty Images) Exeter prop Hoani TuiExeter Chiefs prop Hoani Tui is targeting a big month ahead for the Devon club as they look to push on not only in the Aviva Premiership, but also within the Amlin Challenge Cup.On Friday night, Rob Baxter’s side return to domestic action when they travel to Sale Sharks at Edgeley Park (7.45pm), before they then gear up to entertain promoted Worcester Warriors a week later. Following those two fixtures, the Chiefs return to European exploits when they come up against Pool 4 leaders Newport-Gwent Dragons in back-to-back encounters.“It’s a big month ahead for us,” admitted Tui. “Friday will be a tough game because they have been going well. They’ve brought in a few new players this year; they’ve got a couple of sharp backs who lead from the front; plus they have a strong forward pack, so they will be a handful.”That said, the Chiefs – buoyed by last weekend’s 68-0 thumping of Italian side Cavalieri Prato – will travel to Stockport in good stead and with the knowledge that they defeated the Sharks twice in top flight action last season.“It will be tough up there, we know that,” added the New Zealand-born prop. “When we were in the Championship we played them in pre-season and we obviously went there in the Premiership last year, so we’ve got used to going there and playing them. It’s a smaller pitch compared to Sandy Park, so hopefully my lungs will cope.“But it’s like any game, it all starts up front. They’ve got a good pack and a good scrum, so we have to be aware. We can’t go up there, start well and then drop away, we have to put in a full 80-minute performance.” “Last week we didn’t have too much to go on with Prato, so we concentrated on ourselves,” he said. “This week has been more of the same, although we do have more information on Sale. That said, we will no doubt go in with a similar mentality as last week and with the thought that we play our own style of footy.“The last couple of Premiership games we have played well and come away with some bonus points, but now we’re getting towards the middle of the season so we have to kick on from the good start we had. Hopefully over these next two weeks we can come away with a couple of wins.”last_img read more

Crusaders name strong team ahead of Bulls play-offs

first_img Wyatt Crockett comes in to take the number 1 jerseyCrusaders Head Coach Todd Blackadder has made two changes in the forwards and one in the backs for his team to play the Bulls in the 2012 Super Rugby qualifier match this Saturday.Wyatt Crockett will wear the number one jersey and Ben Franks will move to the bench. Locks Sam Whitelock and Tom Donnelly also switch positions from last week’s game, with Whitelock coming into the starting fifteen at number five and Donnelly taking a place on the bench.Adam Whitelock moves back to the wing this week, vacating the outside centre position for Robbie Fruean.  Sean Maitland will provide cover from the bench.The winner from this game will progress to the semi-finals, playing either the Chiefs or the Stormers depending on the result from the other qualifier match.  But Blackadder said it is about more than that for Crusaders fans.“This is obviously our most important match yet this season.  But it’s not just about the footy this weekend.  This is about Crusaders fans getting another opportunity to come together and show that our spirit is still strong after all that has happened to us. Starting XV:15. Israel Dagg, 14. Adam Whitelock, 13. Robbie Fruean, 12. Ryan Crotty, 11. Zac Guildford, 10. Dan Carter, 9.  Andy Ellis, 1. Wyatt Crockett, 2. Corey Flynn, 3. Owen Franks, 4. Luke Romano, 5. Sam Whitelock, 6. George Whitelock, 7. Matt Todd, 8. Richie McCaw [C]Replacements:16. Quentin MacDonald, 17. Ben Franks, 18. Tom Donnelly, 19.  Luke Whitelock, 20. Willi Heinz, 21. Tom Taylor, 22. Sean Maitland LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND – JUNE 30: Wyatt Crockett of the Crusaders leads his team out onto the field for his 100th game at the start of the round 16 Super Rugby match between the Crusaders and the Hurricanes at AMI Stadium on June 30, 2012 in Christchurch, New Zealand. (Photo by Martin Hunter/Getty Images) “We are so grateful to our supporters for helping us get as far as we have this season.  Just by being at the stadium for the Bulls game, they will be helping us towards another win,” Blackadder said.“So please join the Crusaders at home this Saturday night – it’s going to be something special.”Crusaders v The BullsSaturday, 21 July 2012 at AMI Stadium, ChristchurchKick-off: 08:35 BSTlast_img read more

Six Nations: Scotland 27-22 Ireland

first_imgReason to be cheerful: Man of the Match Stuart Hogg Scotland won the opening game of the Six Nations for the first time since 2006, defeating Ireland in a game spent innovating in the first half and then digging in during the second.Before the match there was a sense of confidence in Scotland, a feeling absent for some years. That confidence came with a caveat – “It will be close,” the wisdom ran. Well that would end up proving to be correct, but perhaps few expected Scotland to pour it on as they did in the first half. Two Stuart Hogg fissures and a cheeky lineout move involving Alex Dunbar looked to catch Ireland cold.Ireland looked to have the bit between their teeth and the momentum behind them in the second half, with Sean O’Brien and Jamie Heaslip drawing more attention while the phases ticked over. They had a deserved first-half try for Keith Earls before the second half offered up robust, swing-of-the-game scores for Iain Henderson and Paddy Jackson. That put Ireland ahead for the first time. They had the ascendency in the scrum. Indeed, as they rolled on the air seemed to suck out of the stadium and a familiar feeling crept up.Yet Scotland kept burrowing. Their rearguard scrambling, willingness to meet the collisions and the boot of Greig Laidlaw saw them over the line.Beefy burst: Sean O’Brien carries hardWHAT’S HOT…Innovation – At the dying moments of the first half, it genuinely looked like Scotland were going to score their bonus point try. In the end they forced it and almost allowed Simon Zebo an intercept try. That man himself spun and wriggled. O’Brien picked from a ruck when there was no guard ahead and galloped up field. And Paddy Jackson’s brain shifted gears quick enough to wobble through the defence and score when they foolishly rushed up at him.Big defence – As he spoke to the press, Vern Cotter called out the team’s defence. He saw it as the nation’s best win of his reign, but at the bedrock of it was punchy tackling and the work-rate.First-ever bonus point – Ireland will be deeply disappointed in their first half, and in letting Scotland regain the lead far into the second. However, no matter how loose they felt they were, to grab three tries and keep in touch speaks of a team who can be dangerous even when being sloppy. Cotter reckons they will grow as a force. Schmidt will be putting the hammer down to make sure they are.Stuart Hogg – It is one helluva thing to live up to the hype. But while pure pace saw him score his first, to stand wide and dummy during a two-on-one to grab his second try was impressive. The bad news for you, mate, is pretty much everyone else has him in their Fantasy team!Old pals act: Vern Cotter and Joe SchmidtWHAT’S NOT…Timely penalties – While Scotland conceded two more penalties during this game, Ireland infringed at the death when they should have been seeing things out. It was at a point in time when caution should have been the watchword. Ireland Rob Kearney, Keith Earls (T Bowe 67), Garry Ringrose, Robbie Henshaw, Simon Zebo, Paddy Jackson, Conor Murray; Jack McGrath (C Healy 56), Rory Best (c), Tadhg Furlong (J Ryan 68), Iain Henderson (U Dillane 63), CJ Stander, Sean O’Brien (J van der Flier 65), Jamie Heaslip. Weakness in the win – Scotland do have one big area to work on: set-piece. Scrum was under real pressure (although the fact Zander Fagerson lasted the 80 will hearten Cotter). Lineout was erratic. They made up for it with turnovers at key moments and sterling defence, but that will take a lot of work.Wastefulness – Ireland in fact dominated on several fronts. More possession, more clean breaks, more defenders beaten, more offloads… They gave up turnovers, but they could have converted more chances. Especially when they looked to have the advantage. Could they have gone for the sticks more?Handshake: Sean Maitland and Richie Gray, plus Zander FagersonSTATISTICS213 – the number of tackles put in by Scotland – compared with Ireland’s 117.11 – the number of years since Scotland last won a Championship opener.7 – The number of defenders Rob Kearney beat.2 – Two penalties from Jamie Heaslip at the very death will sting for the No 8 who has been in incredible form of late.Scotland Stuart Hogg; Sean Maitland, Huw Jones (Mark Bennett 60), Alex Dunbar, Tommy Seymour; Finn Russell (D Weir 47), Greg Laidlaw (c); Allan Dell (G Reid 55), Fraser Brown (R Ford 4), Zander Fagerson, Richie Gray, Jonny Gray, Ryan Wilson,  Hamish Watson (J Barclay 49), Josh Strauss (T Swinson 65).Replacements: Simon Berghan, Ali PriceTries: Hogg 2, Dunbar. Con: Laidlaw 3. Pen: Laidlaw 2. Replacements: Niall Scannell, Kieran Marmion, Ian Keatley LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tries: Earls, Henderson, Jackson. Con: Jackson 2. Pen: Jackson.last_img read more

Mario Ledesma unveiled as new Argentina coach

first_imgRecall? Saracens prop Juan Figallo could be selected by Argentina (Getty Images)“We have given them a list of players that we need,” says Ledesma. “It is not news that we are short of front-rowers and when we are ready to make an announcement, we will do it, but at this moment in time it wouldn’t be good to throw names.”With regards Nicolás Sánchez, who has signed for Stade Français but is under contract with the UAR until the end of the year, Ledesma says: “He will play for us after what has been probably his best season, but it opens an opportunity in the future to develop new players in that and other positions.”On the move: Nicolas Sanchez has signed for Stade Francais (Getty Images)A good speaker, Ledesma captivated an audience at the announcement as he explained his goals for Argentina, currently ranked tenth in the World Rugby Rankings.Los Pumas will play against England in next year’s World Cup, playing in Pool C with France, Tonga and the USA.Whilst he would not be drawn to talk about the tournament in 13 months’ time, he says: “We need to define urgent things ahead of the Rugby Championship and RWC will be the cherry on the top. Today we must work in defining our identity and setting up structures, but it is very clear that all of what we do from now on will be useful in preparing for Japan next year.“It is very clear that our success will depend on how we work from now on to the World Cup.”Cheika was a huge mentor for Ledesma, and the Pumas will meet Australia in rounds four and six of the Rugby Championship in coming weeks. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “The goal for Argentina will be to be competitive in every game and we will prepare to be able to be in the game; the challenge will be for all of us to step up and be ready.”Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. New boss: Mario Ledesma has been named Argentina coach (Getty Images) center_img Frankie Deges reports on the latest from Argentina as Mario Ledesma takes charge of the Pumas Mario Ledesma unveiled as new Argentina coachFormer Pumas hooker and Wallaby forwards coach Mario Ledesma has been announced as the new Argentina head coach in Buenos Aires following a successful first season in charge of the Jaguares in Super Rugby.Ledesma will be able to select overseas-based players in his Test squad on a ‘need-to’ basis and is aiming to recall front-row players – Saracens prop Juan Figallo could be one of those.Capped 84 times between 1996 and 2011, as well as playing in four World Cups and being arguably the best hooker at Wales 1999 and France 2007, Ledesma turned to coaching immediately after his last game against the All Blacks in Auckland in 2011, first with Michael Cheika at Stade Français, then with Montpellier. He later moved to Australia as consultant with the Waratahs and then took charge of the Wallaby pack, again linking up with Cheika.Bright spark: Mario Ledesma had a successful first season as Jaguares coach (Getty Images)He returned home after 18 years of living overseas at the end of last year to run Jaguares and took the team to the quarter-finals in his first Super Rugby season. Following the resignation of Pumas coach Daniel Hourcade at the end of the June Test window, Ledesma has now landed the top job and will face South Africa in the Rugby Championship in his first game in charge.“The dream of every coach at any level is to coach the national team and I had this dream but never thought it would come so quickly. I had it in my mind and my heart and it is the biggest honour,” says Ledesma.“Being the captain of this ship is an honour and not a pressure, knowing we can impact Argentine rugby and culturally our country.”Related: The Rugby Championship refereesThe big issue around the Pumas recently has been the availability of overseas-based players, with Hourcade restricted to picking only those based in Argentina. The Argentine Rugby Union Council is now allowing Ledesma to select players in extreme cases.last_img read more

Churches ask Philippine government to improve human rights record

first_imgChurches ask Philippine government to improve human rights record Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [Ecumenical News International] Church activists from the Philippines on May 30 criticized the government of President Benigno S. Aquino III for failure to improve a climate of rampant human rights violations, including extrajudicial killings, forced disappearances and evictions.They spoke at a public hearing at the Ecumenical Centre in Geneva organized by the Commission of the Churches on International Affairs (CCIA) of the World Council of Churches (WCC). Also involved were the National Council of Churches in the Philippines (NCCP) and the Philippine Universal Periodic Review Watch (UPR Watch), according to a WCC news release.Members of UPR Watch, representing a coalition of organizations in the Philippines, were in Geneva to share their concerns about human rights violations at the United Nations Human Rights Council’s 13th session of the Universal Periodic Review process and lobby various country missions for the protection of human rights.Among the main speakers were human rights attorney Edre Olalia, secretary general of the National Union of People’s Lawyers; municipal councillor Ernan Baldomero of Lezo in Aklan province; Father Jonash Joyohoy, executive director of the Ramento Project for Rights Defenders and Representatives of the NCCP; and Dr. Mathews George Chunakara, director of the CCIA.Mathews George spoke about the WCC’s engagement with churches in the Philippines. “The WCC has been accompanying churches in the Philippines in their struggle for human rights during the past four decades, since the martial law was declared in 1972,” he said.“The rampant militarization and human rights violations continued during the fourteen years of the martial law period in the Philippines, and still continue under successive democratically elected governments. This warrants more vigilance and international advocacy regarding the human rights situation in the Philippines,” he added.In his presentation, Joyohoy questioned the Philippine government’s claim of a “dramatic decline” in the number of victims of human rights violations.“Human right defenders, the victims and their families have submitted reports that belie the overstated achievements of the Philippine government. We count 76 victims of extrajudicial killings and nine victims of enforced disappearances since Aquino took office,” he said.“While the government report is claiming a ‘dramatic decline’ in the killings, our count of a total of 85 precious lives speaks otherwise,” added Joyohoy.He also mentioned the killings of Archbishop Alberto Ramento of the Philippine Independent Church, Father William Tadena and the lay church volunteer Benjamin Bayles as examples of the government’s inability to curb human rights violations.In another presentation, Olalia described how activists and dissenters are charged with criminal offenses. Olalia called this a failure in the legal system and recommended that the international community “study the creation of special human rights courts to exclusively try and dispose of civil and criminal cases of human rights violations and implement a special procedure for such a purpose to make legal remedies simple, expeditious and accessible.” Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC By ENInews StaffPosted Jun 5, 2012 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Anglican Communion The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Advocacy Peace & Justice, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

Video: Presiding Bishop preaches in Ramallah

first_img Rector Washington, DC Posted Dec 31, 2012 Julian Malakar says: Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel January 1, 2013 at 12:08 am You do remember that ‘the agony of Christ on the Cross’ was caused by religious people? They hunted him down and attacked him until finally they killed him on a charge of religious heresy. Therefore as we contemplate the agony of Christ on the Cross this should not become a call for more religious abstractions, nor should it be interpreted as the call for some more religion, only of a different kind, but rather religious people must change their hardened hearts, become more humble and repentant and find God, and not find religion or abstract doctrines about the cross. Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Julian Malakar says: Rector Tampa, FL January 13, 2013 at 5:12 pm I want to reveal from the heart the prayer of faiths that know God:in our prayers if we lie flat we see God made the earth for us to be from Him. If we touch our foreheads to the ground we see God is greater than all imagination. If we stand nodding, we see God says “yes” to all prayers. If we put our hands together we see God wants to be embraced. If we genuflect we see God wants our hearts to soar. If we dance we see God reveals himself for joy. God’s love is for all. For Heaven we are made for. Let Episcopalians rejoice : we know Jesus. Julian Malakar says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Middle East, Advocacy Peace & Justice, Video: Presiding Bishop preaches in Ramallah An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL December 31, 2012 at 8:20 pm Should the Church listen to cry of the world, or to agony of Jesus at the Cross, for changing harden heats young and matured, to be humble and repentance, and find God, we all ages looking for, in places like in the Church, in the restaurant, on the road, in the society, in the school, on the job, in humility and meet current challenge of the world with confidence and faith on Him? Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Brent Herbert says: Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY stewart david wigdor says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Israel-Palestine, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Comments (5) Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Video Director of Music Morristown, NJ January 4, 2013 at 12:30 am “They hunted him down and attacked him until finally they killed him on a charge of religious heresy”, with this believe we are missing Christ’s true love for us now, then and generation to come. His agony caused not by a particular group of people in a time but of spiritual sins happening all the time until Judgment Day. Because of this Church celebrates Holy Communion until His coming again, following Christ’s command, to reflect His agony and be humble and repented.If we have faith on the word of God in the Bible, we know that Jesus, the Son of God, is creator of all seen and unseen like heaven, angels, black matter etc. as said in Apostle Creed. Had He chose to save Himself from His attackers, He could do so, but humankind would miss His abandon love for forgiveness of sins to be His children. His love for forgiving our debts is not without any preconditions. Preconditions believe Jesus as Son of God and sin no more. How can human know what sins are to the eyes of God, not eyes of human? Good writings or sermon in pulpit would not satisfy human mind unless it has solid evidence that new teachings are from God, as Jesus proved Himself, His divinity to the world thru miraculous signs, like resurrection. Like Philip asked Jesus to show His Father to believe Him, people like to see thru godly resource; new teaching comes from God not from human mind. There are plenty of eyewitness evidences recorded in the Bible causing the Bible to believe word of God and recognizing good and evil works. Like all that glitters is not gold, all religious people are not religious. Priority of the Church (Body of Christ) is to make its sheep educated enough listening master’s cry at the cross and restraint sins attracted by human body and blood and find God everywhere as Mother Teresa found in the eyes of the poorest of poor. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, January 16, 2013 at 12:41 pm “Let Episcopalians rejoice: we know Jesus.” I am an Episcopalian too. What Jesus we are talking about? Are we talking about resurrected Jesus in the Bible glorified as “Christ”, savior of all souls, thru Him humankind “came back to pavilion” where we used to belong since creation as children of God; or Jesus in the Koran honored as prophet, but less than Prophet Mohammed, godly man but not crucified and resurrected; or historical Jesus as a good man, married and have family?What we believe play an important role in innovating new teaching, accepting or rejecting new teaching by congregation over existing practice in the Church. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Episcopal News Service] “Our brothers are looking for the Holy One even if they don’t yet have the language for what it is they are seeking. Are you looking everywhere for Jesus? Go out and seek other anxious children, those brothers and sisters of ours who are also looking for him. We will find him in our Father’s house, even if it’s in another room,” said Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori in her Dec. 30 sermon.The presiding bishop preached during the 11 a.m. service at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Ramallah; Anglican Bishop in Jerusalem Suheil S. Dawani presided over the Dec. 30 service attended by some 40 people. The Rev. Hannah Daleh, rector of St. Andrew’s, and the Rev. Canon John Organ, the bishop’s chaplain, assisted.The presiding bishop is visiting Israel and the Palestinian Territories at Dawani’s invitation. She is accompanied by Bishop James Magness, the Episcopal Church’s bishop suffragan for federal ministries; the Rev. Canon Robert Edmunds, the Episcopal Church’s Middle East global partnerships officer; and Alexander Baumgarten, director of the Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations.The full text of the presiding bishop’s sermon follows.First Sunday after Christmas30 Dec 2012St. Andrew’s, RamallahThe Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchSeveral years ago, I visited a congregation in western Kentucky, where the teen-aged boys and girls gave me a T-shirt with their motto:  Grace Church Acolytes – playing with fire since 1853.  On Christmas morning at St. George’s Cathedral I met an 8-year-old doing the same thing – he was entrusted with carrying the gospel book.  An older boy carried the flaming thurible, spreading sweet incense around the altar, over that same gospel book, and throughout the congregation.  That’s what Samuel was doing – serving in the Lord’s house, keeping the oil lamps burning.  The children in our midst learn many things from playing with fire – not just fire safety, but the possibilities that come when God’s word is flaming up within us and among us.  They also learn about the remarkable fires that can be lit when that living Word runs through the stubble of the world’s leavings.  That is exactly what Jesus’ earthly parents had on their hands in a youngster who engaged his elders with the burning coals of God’s word.It’s been a joy and delight to see how deeply valued children are here, how they are encouraged to grow and develop their unique gifts and treasure the ways they’ve been created.  Even and perhaps especially in the midst of the challenges of life here, there is something remarkably peaceful – filled with peace – about the presence and affirmation and encouragement of children, from the very youngest to those beginning to mature into adults.  The birth of God in human flesh continues in our midst as the body of Christ is renewed.  Toddlers take communion, included as full members of this body.  Children take their place in the worship of the church.  Youth learn about serving their neighbors in the wider world, and the hard and life-giving work of peace-making.I’ve met children and youth on the streets of Jerusalem who know something of their own strength for this work.  A girl of about 10 stopped me when I was out running by pounding on her wrist with the other hand, demanding to know what time it was – she and her friend must get to school on time!  I understood not a word, but she got her message across.  Another day, a gaggle of teen-aged boys standing at a bus stop laughed at me running up a steep hill, asking in their broken English if I wanted help, or a push up the hill.  These children are bold enough to challenge because they know themselves beloved and treasured.  When people know their own dignity, there is enough room for humor, and peace begins to be made.  Jesus’ response to his parents’ three-day frantic search sounds like that – he’s gently making fun of them for not knowing where he’d be.  They had taught him well, after all.At the same time, the world then and now is filled with children and young people who are not valued for themselves or loved and respected as the image of God.  Too many young lives are seen as commodities to be traded, sold, or enslaved to suit the purposes of others.  Modern slavery is just as vicious as anything practiced in our human past.  Babies are sold in China[1]; children are held as slaves to fish in Lake Volta[2]; thousands of girls and a few boys are enslaved in prostitution all over the world[3].  Children in many places find limits placed on their futures because of gender or social status, and economic realities limit the access of millions of children to education and the possibility of meaningful employment.Jesus was born into a world of profound limitation, yet he became the open door for all God’s children.  His taking on mortal flesh as a powerless infant shows the world that God’s greatest treasure is to be found in that same condition.  The adult Jesus insists that his friends not keep the children away, for they show us the infinite worth of God’s reign in our midst.  The kingdom is open to those who care for the least of these, and that kingdom welcomes all who encourage rather than dissuade the little ones.  Isaiah reminds us that “a little child will lead them” – for children can show us the path to that ancient dream of peace.Are we older ones willing to be led?  Are we willing to discover the divine light in the younger among us?  Babies aren’t just cute bundles to be dandled on a knee; they are agents of change, as anyone who has ever listened to a loud cry can attest.  That cry insists, “change me” or “change something about my environment – now!”  The insistence of those who have more words is just as significant.One of the greatest challenges for our tradition in these times is how and whether we will listen to those cries for change – toward peace, for justice, for meaning in the face of a world that can seem meaningless.  In the western context, young adults are frequently absent from our churches.  They are, however, asking questions of utmost spiritual significance – “how can I live a meaningful life; how can I build a world of justice for all people; how can I make a difference in this world?”  Some who have grown up in Christian communities are asking why the churches don’t help them discover answers to those questions.  Others can’t hear good news in unfamiliar music or the language of insiders.  Why do churches refuse to change in ways that might address those seekers and their hunger for good news?Many in and outside the churches are discovering, or perhaps remembering, that vital communities of faith have always had to wrestle with the challenges of new contexts and questions.  Moses did.  Abraham did.   Those who went into exile in Babylon did, and so did those who returned here with new ways of worship.  Even Jesus changed, and his conversation with the Syrophoenician woman is a great example.[4]  The woman asks for healing for her daughter, and when Jesus declines to heal a Gentile, she pushes until she gets what she is after – an acknowledgement of her dignity, and access to the healing power of God.The younger ones around us are making the same challenge:  “we want to see God, we want to encounter the holy in our own lives and contexts.  We don’t understand what you’re doing there inside your churches.  We need to see God out here, on the street, in our lives as students, looking for jobs, struggling to find a way in this world, finding a reason to live.”Christmas Eve in the cathedral was glorious, but it was even more wonderful to talk to the people who stayed after for hot chocolate.  I met a group of five young adults – I think secular Jews – Israelis who had come to see a Christmas celebration, and were filled with wondering questions.  Some of them knew far more about what was going on than I expected.  They were all eager and hungry to connect with the divine.  It is not only Jesus’ parents who have been searching for him with great anxiety – his siblings are.  We can help others discover him, in his father’s house, which includes all creation, not just the part of it inside churches.  He’s all around us, and everywhere, not only inside here.  Our brothers and sisters are looking for the holy one, even if they don’t yet have language for what they seek.Are you looking everywhere for Jesus?  Go and seek out other anxious children, those brothers and sisters of ours, who are also looking for him.  We’ll find him in our father’s house, even if it’s in a different room.[1] http://rendezvous.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/26/buy-sell-adopt-child-trafficking-in-china[2] http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/09/slavery-still-exists/262847/[3] http://www.nbcbayarea.com/investigations/From-Sex-Slave-to-Activist-How-a-Berkeley-Woman-is-Using-Her-Past-to-Help-Others–184471481.html; http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2012/11/25/an-escape-from-cambodian-sex-slavery.html[4] Mark 7:25-30 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments are closed. 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Re-imagining task force members say ‘real challenge’ is transformation

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Tags Task Force for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church Co-convener Katy George gives an update on the group’s work Oct. 15 to members of Executive Council meeting in Chicago. The Rev. Dwight Zscheile, TREC member, right, also participated in the briefing and discussion with council. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg, Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Chicago, Illinois] One of the co-conveners of the Task Force for Re-imagining the Episcopal Church told Executive Council Oct. 15 that the task force was aiming for “not just a legislative success”; that is, having the 2015 General Convention accept its recommendations.“The real challenge is actually not in the legislative success; the real challenge is turning the proposals into real action and into a sustained way of working across the church in a way that really meets all of our dreams and visions for what the church should be,” said Co-convener Katy George.TREC’s work began in July 2012, when General Convention, by way of Resolution C095, called for a task force “to present the 78th General Convention with a plan for reforming the church’s structures, governance, and administration.”George and the Rev. Dwight Zscheile, a task force member, updated council members on the group’s work and led them in a discussion of some of its effort thus far.TREC already has received a lot of feedback from some members of the church, ranging from the “nitty-est and grittiest to the most broad perspective,” George said.The 24 TREC members, George said, know that the church is already changing, and so the group’s work is “not about tweaking a current approach just to make it a little more efficient because that’s all that’s needed.”“We understand that the role of church, the role of religion, the role of the Episcopal Church has been changing dramatically in our society,” she said.“We see that in dwindling church attendance and in dwindling church resources, and so we are very aware that what we are about is not just making our current church work a little bit more efficiently – although it would be nice if it did – but that we really should be setting forth a vision to help coalesce the church around what it can be in the 21st century: a vital and exciting church that calls people to it and has a wonderful influence in our world.”The task force knows that, in such major change work, structure “is never the right starting point and it is never the whole answer,” George, a management consultant, told the council.Instead, such work is really about what knowing what the organization’s culture is, what the “degree of alignment around the vision is,” how all in the organization are working towards that vision and discerning whether the organization has the right skills to get there, she said.George said TREC had limited its scope to the work of General Convention; Executive Council; the presiding bishop; president of the House of Deputies; the church center staff; and the church’s committees, commissions, agencies and boards.The task force is not considering the work of the church in its nine provinces, its dioceses, congregations and other church bodies, although George acknowledged that decisions made about the workings of those people and groups in the “in-scope list” will no doubt influence the structure and work of the entities on the second list. Those possible changes might be “an appropriate follow-on activity for the next triennium,” George said.Later in the council’s discussion, member Steve Hutchinson wondered whether General Convention’s desire to have a report in 2015 was a challenge to true engagement in all the facets of such work. And council member John Johnson urged TREC to take risks and be provocative with its recommendations to the 2015 convention.The council also spent about an hour discussing with George and Zscheile some of the principles included in an Initial Working Report on Identity and Vision that TREC released a few weeks ago. The report, on which the House of Bishops received a briefing and the task force’s House of Deputies members sent a letter to their colleagues, outlined the task force’s work to look for answers to the following questions:Who are we as Episcopalians? What is our particular identity?How is Episcopal identity being expressed and renewed in the context of the 21st century?How has our churchwide organization evolved, and does the current paradigm best support our identity and calling in today’s context?What do we need from a churchwide organization today and going forward?In the report, the task force said that “a new paradigm for Episcopal Church organization must be rooted in our identity,” naming as its “overarching organizational principle” the sense that “structure should foster a shared identity and sense of community, while resisting attempts to unduly narrow the church’s life and witness.”The report named “four specific roles that the churchwide organization could and should play,” including “catalyst, connector, capability builder and convener.”“We really are looking for substantive engagement on these ideas,” George told the council, adding that the task force is “very open” to revising its work on those ideas as it goes through the next year until it is due to make its report to General Convention public in late 2014.George and Zscheile urged council members to encourage engagement and feedback to help with that refinement. Connecting to that, the day before TREC’s presentation to the council, the group announced its plans to “to continue to engage the church at all levels in an ongoing conversation about how we can re-imagine our structures, governance and administration in a way that best responds to God’s call at this moment in our common life, and helps most faithfully live into the church God is calling us to become in the future,” in the words of TREC’s other co-convener, the Rev. Craig Loya.The so-called Engagement Kit, which includes overviews, guidelines for engagement, facilitator’s notes, charts and other materials, can be downloaded in either PowerPoint or PDF form at the task force’s site here. The kit, Loya said, is intended to be used by any local, diocesan or churchwide gathering.There is also an opportunity for online engagement, which is a series of four questions.The materials are meant to deal in part with the reality that, while Resolution C095 called on the task force to hold a “special gathering” to receive responses to any proposed recommendations it was considering sending to the 2015 meeting of General Convention, the convention did not give the task force the estimated $450,000 it would take to stage such a meeting. The convention approved (line 282 here) $200,000 specifically for the gathering.In addition, the task force will have met three times for two days each by the end of 2013 (TREC meets again Dec. 6-7). Each of those meetings costs money as well. The convention allocated $630,449 to be divided among all of the church’s committees, commissions, agencies and boards, including the task force.The task force asked for and received a $150,000 grant from Trinity Wall Street. Loya told ENS in July, “We also talked about other ways to convene … that may be a helpful way of modeling new ways for the church to gather.”George said TREC was now contemplating a plan to hold a churchwide gathering in July 2014, funding what it could of the total cost out of its budget and asking provinces and individuals to pay for their participation.House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings hinted at the implications of the changing nature of the Episcopal Church during her opening remarks.“Figuring out our identity as advocates for the gospel requires us to set aside, yet again, our old establishment identity as the church of power and privilege,” she said. “Whether it’s Congress or big business, those who inhabit the corridors of worldly power aren’t obligated to listen to us anymore — if they ever were. But that doesn’t mean we should stop speaking. We must speak up, not because we are powerful in the culture, but because we are Christians called by God to raise our voices for those who have no voice.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori pointed in her opening remarks to the already-changing nature of the church as well, and thus the council’s work, noting the members had “important work to do in beginning to shape a missional framework for the next triennium’s churchwide mission and ministry.”The council’s budget subcommittee has received feedback from the church, she said, that point to keeping the Five Marks of Mission “as the desired framework, as well as a focus on evangelism, development of new and existing faith communities in the Episcopal tradition and an understanding that the churchwide structure should focus on networking and resource-sharing.”ENS coverage of the initial work of TREC is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Executive Council, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Structure, Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church Executive Council October 2013, Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 15, 2013 Re-imagining task force members say ‘real challenge’ is transformation Council hears update on TREC’s work, discusses foundational assumptions Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY last_img read more

‘Reclaiming Gospel of Peace’ wraps up in Oklahoma City

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Advocacy Peace & Justice, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Reclaiming the Gospel of Peace 2014 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori reads the intentions conference attendees placed on cross during the closing Eucharist of Reclaiming Gospel of Peace at St Paul’s Cathedral in Oklahoma City. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Oklahoma City, Oklahoma] After nearly three days of learning and praying about how to turn the epidemic tide of violence in the world, participants in the Reclaiming the Gospel of Peace gathering left here to begin Holy Week as the United States witnessed yet another shooting attack.Frazier Glenn Cross, 73, of Aurora, Missouri, is accused of killing three people during two separate shootings April 13 in Overland Park, Kansas, at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City and in a parking lot at Village Shalom, a senior living community about a mile away. Cross is as a former Ku Klux Klan leader with a history of anti-Semitism and racism, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil rights organization that tracks hate groups.Temple Israel and St. Thomas the Apostle Episcopal Church in Overland Park gathered at St. Thomas the evening of the shootings for a vigil service for those who were impacted by the violence.“I know they are in heaven together,” Mindy Corporon told the vigil. She is the daughter of slain William Lewis Corporon and mother of Reat Griffin Underwood, 14, who was killed with his grandfather.The name of the third person killed, a woman, has not yet been released.“There are no words but words are all we have,” Kansas Bishop Dean Wolfe told those gathered.And, at the end of the Reclaiming the Gospel of Peace gathering on April 11, Diocese of Maryland Bishop Eugene Sutton told the participants that “out of talk, much can happen.”Two women who have experienced horrific violence and its aftermath set the tone for the closing day of the gathering.The Rev. Kathie Adams-Shepherd, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Newtown, Connecticut, gave the morning reflection April 11 and talked about her parish’s experience of the Dec. 14, 2012, massacre at nearby Sandy Hook Elementary School. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS“I am standing here this morning because the violence that takes the lives of God’s beloved children every day all over our county and our world visited us in all its horrific and tragic loss in the quiet suburb of Newtown, Connecticut, on Dec. 14, 2012,” said the Rev. Katie Adams-Shepherd, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Newtown, Connecticut, during morning worship.“Twenty-eight lives, violently and tragically cut short by a mentally ill man who had access to the kinds of weapons and high capacity magazines that he simply should never have had at his disposal, but rather should have had access to affirming mental health care and support,” she said.“We in Newtown are well aware that we joined a large part of the world that suffers mercilessly from violence and terrorism.”In the aftermath of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the world took notice and the tragedy served as a  “tipping point” for people of faith, she said.“It’s a very important part of the healing process for every person touched by violence and violent death that we come together from all corners of live and faith, belief and perspectives seeking a way, multiple ways to live as co-missioners with God,” said Adams-Shepherd.“I’m sorry that it took such a tragedy in an affluent community in one of the wealthiest counties in a first world country to wake us up even just enough to have conversations like this one,” said Adams-Shepherd. “The horrific and violent deaths of our brothers and sisters and all of our children all over the world for all these years should have been equally compelling.”In the 16 months following the shooting, Adams-Shepherd said her community has become more engaged with others worldwide, including in Oklahoma, Colorado, South Sudan and El Salvador, communities that have suffered violent deaths, whether they’ve resulted from natural disasters or mark the everyday reality of life.Melissa McLawhorn Houston, a survivor of the Oklahoma City bombing, shared her story with the group. Houston participates in the National Memorial and Museum’s First Person: Stories of Hope program. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSMelissa McLawhorn Houston has also transformed her experience of violent death into a way to help others around the world deal with similar events. She survived the April 19, 1995, bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. On that day during Holy Week almost 20 years ago Timothy McVeigh committed an act of domestic terrorism that killed 168 people and injured 600 others; one of the first 20th century tragedies in what has become an epidemic of violence in the United States.Houston and other bombing survivors tell their stories to visitors to the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum and to people who have suffered from violence, including the 2011 bombing and shootings in Norway that left nearly 100 people dead.“One of the biggest ingredients that we see in terrorists is a lack of hope,” Houston told Reclaiming the Gospel participants during a visit to the museum. “If you don’t have your own sense of hopefulness for your own life, that’s where a lot of that starts from.”Houston, who spent 10 years working for the Oklahoma Office of Homeland Security after the Murrah bombing and who now works as chief of staff for the state’s attorney general, said ultimately she had to choose how to respond to what happened to her that day in downtown Oklahoma City. She has chosen to be a “hopeful witness” despite feeling “a sense of evil” in the second after the blast knocked her to the ground of her office across the street from the Murrah building and showered her with debris.The Rev. Joseph Harmon, rector of Christ Church, East Orange, New Jersey, takes in the exhibits at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSExperiencing that sort of violence does not leave people unscathed, Houston acknowledged, recalling her message and those of other Murrah survivors to survivors of the Sept. 11 attacks or last year’s Boston Marathon bombing, many of whom turned to Oklahoma City for help and advice.They told those people “it really sucks where you are right now but you will eventually move on. You won’t get over it; you’ll be different, you’ll be changed but, you will continue to have a life.”After suffering  violence, some people choose vengeance, wanting to destroy the person or system they believe cased them harm, Houston said.But others, including the people who tell their stories via the museum’s education program, want to ask how society might help prevent vengeance from growing in people’s hearts. “How do we change people’s hearts and make them understand that just because they’re mad doesn’t entitle them to take 168 lives?” is the question they ask, she said.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts SChori preached April 11 at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at the close of the three-day Reclaiming the Gospel of Peace conference. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSPresiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori spoke about the role of the heart during her sermon at the gathering’s  closing Eucharist.“Countering violence requires custody of the heart,” she said. “Violence begins in the heart, especially in hearts that have been wounded and scarred by the violence of others, and then react and respond aggressively, in overly defended ways.  Violence begins in the heart that cannot countenance vulnerability – rooted in fear that its own vitality will be extinguished.”Violence is intrinsically kin to evil, she said, while “the ultimate counterforce to fear is perfect love, the ability to share life to the full, with radical vulnerability, in the face of those who would destroy it.”“Feeding the rage of violence may briefly burn out the heart of aggression, but it only increases the carnage,” Jefferts Schori said. “It does not increase love.”Earlier in the conference Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby also spoke of the heart’s role in transforming violence.“Reconciliation and an end to violence, or the transformation of violent conflict into non-violent conflict is something that can only be achieved by sacrifice and by a prophetic stand,” he said. “There are no shortcuts and no cheap options, which is why this conference is so important. There are no shortcuts and there are no cheap options. We are talking at this point about change in the heart of the human being, and neither technology nor law will alter that.”However, he warned participants of the work ahead, saying that “reconciliation with God is achieved through the cross, not through conferences and meetings and declarations.”“The Christian disciple is to take up their cross, and for many even today this is no mere metaphor,” Welby said. “Bearing the cross means public ownership of Christ, public association and love with and for all those others who own Christ as Savior, and public commitment to follow Christ wherever we are taken.”Beth Crow, youth missioner in the Diocese of North Carolina, writes “Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me,” on a blackboard panel during a visit to the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSBrother James Dowd, a member of the Order of the Holy Cross, echoed those sentiments when he said during a panel discussion on Episcopal responses to violence that to move more deeply non-violent discipleship of Christ, the contemplative life is essential.”And, it’s not that God needs more monks and nuns, he said.“What God needs is people on the street and people in the parish and people in their homes and people in the workplace who are contemplatives,” Dowd explained. “There’s all kinds of ways to do that in terms of your prayer life; there’s all kinds of prayer techniques. Whatever it is that you were to develop; it is a prayer life that helps you to love more deeply.Reclaiming the Gospel of Peace: An Episcopal Gathering to Challenge the Epidemic of Violence was held April 9-11 at the Reed Center and the nearby Sheraton Midwest City was meant to help Episcopalians renew their commitment to the Gospel call to make peace in a world of violence and “reclaim their role in society as workers for nonviolence and peace.”Conference attendees, including Bishop James Curry, bishop suffragan in the Diocese of Connecticut, center, listen as a National Parks Service guide describes the events of the of April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe gathering of 220 people, including 34 bishops, Jefferts Schori and Welby, was centered on four pillars: advocacy, education, liturgy and pastoral care, aimed at addressing the culture of violence within and outside of the church.Workshops and panel discussions touched on programs designed to meet the needs of children of incarcerated parents, to foster restorative justice programs and to curb violence through job creation and creating alternative paths for at-risk youth, as well as information about advocating for stricter gun laws and purchasing restrictions.Jefferts Schori told a news conference on April 10 that the conference was about “encouraging the world to pay attention to what we believe is the gospel about the reign of God” that describes a “world where people live in peace because there is justice.”“We are seeking to respond to the eternal epidemic of violence in our culture and around the world,” she said. – The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg and Lynette Wilson are editors/reporters for the Episcopal News Service. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Mary Frances Schjonberg and Lynette WilsonPosted Apr 14, 2014 Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA ‘Reclaiming Gospel of Peace’ wraps up in Oklahoma City Anti-violence event participants move into Holy Week as more gun violence occurs Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Gun Violence, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

Breakaway group rejects offer to settle South Carolina property lawsuit

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska June 20, 2015 at 11:27 am It is interesting that the spokeperson for the Lawrence group complained the offer was not legitimate because the PB of TEC did not sign off on it. This is the group that claims dioceses are independent groups not beholden to any National Church. Sounds like they want it both ways when it suits there objective! An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET South Carolina Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET October 2, 2016 at 9:04 pm We are not to use secular courts to settle church matters no one comes to Jesus by compulsion it is a matter of the heart . Jesus prayed father I pray that they be one as we are one only in Christ can we be at peace and one the problem is that if we don’t agree that Jesus is the way the truth and the light and no one comes to the father except by him then we part company It’s not about who is welcome in each other’s church it’s about who we proclaim as the word and the creator of the universe the source is not up for negotiation Rather than being concerned about surfing for church buildings know the God before whom you stand the God if Abraham Isaac and jacob it Is Jesus you are persecuting only believers confess that Jesus Christ is Lord and came in the fleshAs long as Christ is proclaimed then quit accusing the brethren that’s Satans job and sadly he has infected a lot of people Christianity is very spiritual the mire intently you behold Jesus learn of him and he will be the author and finisher of our faith secular retorec has no place here the true wosippers worship in spirit and in truth sadly a great falling away gas happened and the comments above are a testament to that no place Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Property, Breakaway group rejects offer to settle South Carolina property lawsuit June 30, 2015 at 9:19 am Since the PB testified in court that TEC had the right to reject the Virginia settlement plans prepared by Bishop Lee, I think they had a point. TEC has been using lawsuits with the diocese and 815 separately against the breakaways, so a settlement with the diocese wouldn’t stop the lawsuits by 815, unless 815 agreed to it. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] An offer by South Carolina Episcopalians to settle a church-property lawsuit in eastern South Carolina was rejected by a breakaway group on June 15, the same day the offer was made public.The Episcopal Church in South Carolina offered to let 35 parishes keep their church properties, whether or not they choose to remain part of The Episcopal Church.In exchange, the proposal required the breakaway group to return the diocesan property, assets and identity of “The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina” to the diocese that is still affiliated with The Episcopal Church.Hours after the offer was made public, the breakaway group led by Mark Lawrence, who was bishop in 2012 when he announced the diocese was leaving The Episcopal Church, announced that the parishes of the group unanimously rejected the offer.“This is not a legitimate offer of good faith negotiation and never was intended to be,” the Rev. Canon Jim Lewis, Lawrence’s assistant, said in the press release, a longer version of which was e-mailed to Episcopal News Service. He called the offer an effort to disrupt the on-going legal process rather an effort to settle it.Episcopal Church in South Carolina Bishop Charles G. vonRosenberg did not comment on the rejection.A spokesperson for his office said the offer remains on the table despite the breakaway group’s claim in its release that it came with a June 15 deadline. The breakaway group faced a brief-filing deadline in the lawsuit on June 15 in the state Supreme Court and the spokesperson said the Episcopal Church in South Carolina had simply said that it reserved the right to withdraw the offer after that day.In announcing the offer earlier in the day, vonRosenberg had said it stemmed from the hope for reconciliation that Episcopalians in South Carolina have held from the beginning of the dispute. “We see this offer as the strongest possible way we can demonstrate that,” he said.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori consented to the offer and it was presented to attorneys June 2, according to the Episcopal Church in South Carolina’s announcement.Discussions about releasing the parish properties have been going on since early 2013, a few months after the split occurred, the release said.“In a situation like this, where there has been so much grief and misunderstanding caused by the actions of a few, we pray that a gracious response to those who are now separated from us will hasten the day when we can be together as one unified diocese again,” vonRosenberg said.If the offer had been accepted, it would have ended the legal dispute that began in January 2013 when the breakaway group sued The Episcopal Church, and later its local diocese, seeking to control both diocesan and parish property and the identity of the diocese, according to the Episcopal Church of South Carolina release. It also would resolve a federal lawsuit currently before the U.S. District Court in Charleston.The Episcopal Church in South Carolina reorganized the diocese in early 2013 and operates with a part-time staff and a sharply reduced budget funded primarily by contributions from the 30 remaining Episcopal congregations. Meanwhile, the diocesan assets have been in the control of the breakaway group led by Lawrence.The congregations led by Lawrence operate separately without any formal affiliation with a larger religious body. The Episcopal Church in South Carolina remains part of The Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion.In February, a state court judge awarded the properties and identity of the diocese to the breakaway group. Episcopalians have appealed to the South Carolina Supreme Court; oral arguments are set for September 23.The Episcopal Church in South Carolina said that diocesan leaders worked closely with Episcopalians who had been members of breakaway parishes and were left without church buildings in which to worship when the split occurred. “Most have moved ahead and created new Episcopal congregations, and gave their blessing for the settlement offer to be made,” the June 15 release said.“Buildings are important, but what is most important is the people who are in them,”  vonRosenberg said. “It is the people that we long to welcome back into The Episcopal Church once again.”Churches included in the settlement proposal(All these parishes are plaintiffs in the lawsuit against The Episcopal Church and The Episcopal Church in South Carolina)All Saints, FlorenceChrist Church, Mount PleasantChrist the King, WaccamawChrist-St. Paul’s, Yonges IslandChurch of the Cross, BlufftonEpiphany, EutawvilleGood Shepherd, CharlestonHoly Comforter, SumterHoly Cross, StateburgHoly Trinity, CharlestonOld St. Andrew’s, CharlestonChurch of Our Saviour, John’s IslandPrince George Winyah, GeorgetownRedeemer, OrangeburgResurrection, SurfsideSt. Bartholomew’s, HartsvilleSt. David’s, CherawSt. Helena’s, BeaufortSt. James, James IslandSt. John’s, FlorenceSt. John’s, John’s IslandSt. Jude’s, WalterboroSt. Luke’s, Hilton HeadSt. Luke and St. Paul, CharlestonSt. Matthew’s, DarlingtonSt. Matthew’s, Fort MotteSt. Matthias, SummertonSt. Michael’s, CharlestonSt. Paul’s, BennettsvilleSt. Paul’s, ConwaySt. Paul’s, SummervilleSt. Philip’s, CharlestonTrinity, Edisto IslandTrinity, PinopolisTrinity, Myrtle Beach Rector Washington, DC Chris Harwood says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs June 17, 2015 at 8:49 pm See what being nice to one of Bob Duncan’s acolytes got the church. Mark Lawrence’s election should have never been consented to. Live and learn and maybe the SC Supreme Court will do the right thing in the end but if it doesn’t no one should be surprised. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC By ENS staffPosted Jun 15, 2015 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments (4) Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Dr heather dawson says: Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Charles Jett says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Richard Warren says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Christopher Easthill elected to board of German Council of Churches

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Rev. Christopher Easthill with other members of the ACK vorstand. From left to right, Archpriest Radu Constantin Miron (Orthodox Church); Easthill (Anglican/Episcopal); Bishop Karl-Heinz Wiesemann (Roman Catholic Church), chair; Bishop Rosemarie Wenner (Methodist Church), deputy chair; Bishop Martin Hein (Evangelical Church – EKD), deputy chair. Photo: Bergisch-Gladbach, Germany. March 10.At a recent meeting of the German Council of Churches (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Christlicher Kirchen in Deutschland), the Rev. Christopher Easthill was elected to serve on its board or “vorstand.” Easthill, an Episcopal priest, will represent a group of churches including the Anglicans, Old Catholics, Independent Lutherans and the Reformed Church. He was elected to stand for a three-year term.Easthill is priest-in-charge of the Church of St. Augustine of Canterbury, Wiesbaden, Germany. Easthill is a graduate of St. John’s Theological College, Nottingham, UK and the Virginia Theological Seminary, Alexandria, U.S. Prior to his position in Wiesbaden he served as an assistant at the Church of the Ascension, Munich. Christopher is a U.K. national, and since 2014, also a German citizen. Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC People Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ecumenical & Interreligious, Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Christopher Easthill elected to board of German Council of Churches Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted Mar 31, 2016 Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more